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    New Docs: FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe Recused Self from Email Investigation Under Pressure over Clinton Ties

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    FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, whose wife Jill had hundreds of thousands of dollars thrown behind her Virginia State Senate campaign by a Clinton-allied PAC, recused himself from the Hillary Clinton email investigation days before the 2016 presidential election, according to new documents obtained by Judicial Watch.

    The DOJ records were obtained by Judicial Watch in a year-old Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request over which they had launched a lawsuit. The documents were released by Judicial Watch Friday. They indicate McCabe, who remains in his post and served as acting director of the FBI from James Comey’s ouster until Christopher Wray’s confirmation in August, did not recuse himself from the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server during her tenure as Secretary of State until November 1, 2016.

    This recusal one week before the election, four days after then-Director Comey made his momentous announcement that the FBI had reopened the investigation based on new data found on the hard drives of disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY), and eight days after the links between McCabe’s wife and long-time Clinton ally Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe went public.

    Jill McCabe, a political newcomer with little history in the Virginia Democratic Party, was getting over half a million dollars in campaign backing from McAuliffe’s PAC in 2015, at a time her husband’s agency, the FBI, was investigating Clinton. According to the Wall Street Journal report that broke the story, Andrew McCabe was not intimately involved in oversight of the Clinton investigation until after he was appointed deputy director in February, 2016, at which point his wife’s campaign had already failed. At the time of Jill McCabe’s announcement, however, the Clinton investigation was already public knowledge.

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