Without The Electoral College, The United States Is No Longer A Republic

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During the dying days of the Roman Republic, with effete senators stabbing each other in the back when they were not busy in orgies, Julius Caesar followed the exact trajectory of a Leviathan—what Thomas Hobbes described beautifully hundreds of years later. Caesar, by this time opposed to the Senate, which obstructed his imperial aims, decided to cross the river Rubicon, thereby declaring war on the last vestiges of the craven republic.

After crossing the river, Caesar famously said Alea Eacta Est, or the die is cast. Thus crossing the Rubicon is now considered a revolutionary act that aims to destroy the status quo, structure, and balance, from which there’s no return. The only way forward is through chaos.

The current Democratic presidential frontrunners, with their war cries of Electoral College abolition and reduction of the voting age, signify another crossing the Rubicon moment. That’s because without the Senate, and without the Electoral College, there would be no states in the United States of America. Essentially, there would be no republic anymore. And if history is a good teacher, every time there was direct democracy, it has led to a Caesar—or worse.

Warren Opened Up a Foolish Can of Worms

“My view is that every vote matters. And that means get rid of the Electoral College,” said Elizabeth Warren, the most tedious and hopelessly fraudulent of all Democratic candidates, in what could be an exemplary sentence of meaningless tautology. Of course every vote already matters, but that doesn’t make a good catchphrase. – READ MORE

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