BOMBSHELL: Top FBI Insider Who Quit Over Rigged Hillary Probe Ready to Spill Beans on Comey & Obama to Congress

Bombshell development.

An FBI agent who quit his top position over the bureau’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation is heading to Congress to testify. John Giacalone, who led the Clinton investigation for the first seven months, will reportedly expose former President Barack Obama and fired FBI Director James Comey for corruptly helping Clinton.

There’s a massive media blackout on this because Giacalone is expected to testify that top brass at the FBI rigged the investigative process so that Clinton could skirt charges for clear violations of the law. Exposing Comey also shines a big light on Obama, who many believe was calling the shots behind the scenes to help Clinton.

The joint investigation, which is being led by Republican Reps. Bob Goodlatte of Virginia and Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, have laid the groundwork for Congress to finally hold the failed Democratic presidential nominee accountable for breaking the law.

True Pundit wrote about Giacalone in September 2016, the first media outlet to detail why he quit the FBI over Comey’s tainted Hillary Clinton probe. From True Pundit before the presidential election in 2016:

Visionary Reads the Tea Leaves

The wheels on the federal investigations started coming loose after the New Year, in January of this year.

John Giacalone was the supervisor of the bureau’s National Security Branch and also the FBI brains and genesis behind the Clinton email and private server investigation. He first approached Comey in 2015 for the green light to probe how the former secretary of state operated her private email server and handled classified correspondences. Rumors had been swirling in intelligence circles. Once approved, Giacalone spearheaded the investigation, and helped hand select top agents who were highly skilled but also discreet. Many of those agents were concerned when Giacalone abruptly resigned in the middle of the investigation.

FBI insiders said Giacalone used the term “sideways” to describe the direction the Clinton probe had taken in the bureau. Giacalone lamented privately he no longer had confidence in the direction the investigation was headed. He felt it was simpler to quietly step aside, walk away instead of fight to keep the investigation on its proper track. Giacalone was a true heavyweight agent at FBI. In fact, he likely should have been running the entire show. His pedigree included running and creating FBI divisions in New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and even serving as deputy commander in the Iraqi theater of operations. But in the midst of the Clinton investigation, Giacalone handed the bureau his retirement papers in Feb.

“John is a strategic thinker. He recognizes patterns and signs and can then see things long before they develop,” a FBI insider said. “Losing him was a major blow. We now know perhaps what he was envisioning. He didn’t want that around his neck.”

Giacalone could not be reached for comment.

In late 2015 through January 2016, Giacalone shared the frustration of many agents who were perturbed about one lingering issue: When was the FBI going to interview Hillary Clinton?

By June, that frustration had reached a boiling point, largely fueled by Giacalone’s resignation months earlier. Frustrated FBI personnel were beginning to question the pace of the case and believed their intelligence gathering and analysis were beyond strong enough for a referral to the Justice Department in early 2016, sources said. Agents were left to wonder if their dogged research would ever see public eyes. There was a fear creeping into the case that perhaps the investigation was being politicized, that FBI and DOJ brass were trying to run out the clock, or “slow-walk” the case, on what should be considered an easily warranted criminal indictment prior to November’s general election.

Suddenly, Giacalone’s retirement in Feb. was starting to make more sense to FBI grunts who didn’t have the seasoning and street smarts of the retired New Yorker to digest the landscape, months prior, of the probe’s downward trajectory

“The window here has almost closed,” a federal law enforcement source told True Pundit in June. “Clinton should have been interviewed months ago. There is no longer enough time to refer it to DOJ, vet the case with AUSA’s (Assistant US Attorney’s), the AG and her staff, prepare the case, call a Grand Jury, and put the case on.”

Officials in June reiterated that all those elements in the legal process, if expedited without delays or legal snags, would put a grand jury decision to indict in late September or October, just weeks before the election.

“Can you imagine the uproar if she was arrested weeks before the election?” a federal law enforcement source said. “There was a window we were shooting for and we could have made it but everything is so slow now. I mean, she hasn’t even been interviewed. It’s incredible.”

The FBI case agents and support personnel are forbidden to “go public” or comment on the record to share their frustrations and dismay because they each signed an unprecedented confidentiality agreement prior to signing onto work the Clinton investigation. Violating that agreement would likely cost them their careers and pensions. Regardless, True Pundit conducted interviews with FBI assets and support personnel who collectively painted a dark insiders’ portrait of the Clinton criminal probe which was commissioned to determine how Clinton and her aides handled, maintained, stored and ultimately botched some of the most sensitive information ever breached in the country’s 240-year history. True Pundit’s interviews and intelligence gathering on the Clinton investigation found:

  • Allegations of pay-for-play involving the Clinton Foundation were not properly vetted, ultimately white washed
  • FBI agents were blocked from serving search warrants to retrieve key evidence
  • Attempts to secure Clinton’s medical records to confirm her head injury were sabotaged by FBI Director James Comey
  • FBI agents were not allowed to interrogate witnesses and targets without warning
  • Clinton and aides were provided special VIP accommodations during interviews
  • FBI suspended standard investigative tactics employed in other probes
  • FBI agents efforts were often blocked, suppressed by FBI, DOJ brass
  • Agents lost faith that their superiors and DOJ wanted to see the case reach a grand jury

In addition to Giacalone, Bill Priestap, assistant director of the FBI’s counterintelligence division and Michael Steinbach, the former chief of the FBI’s national security department and the individual who succeeded Giacalone, will also testify.

All three men served in top positions at the FBI and were deeply connected to the Clinton email investigation. However, the real headliner here is Giacalone for his proximity to Comey and others involved in the decision to let Clinton evade charges.

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