True Pundit

Business World

Tomorrow’s Lamborghini vehicles won’t lose an ounce of Italian passion

There’s a good reason for this fact: entirely new vehicles are typically developed on three to five year schedules, while refreshed models chime in about once every two years. Worthy new features aren’t usually adopted outside these cycles unless they relate to safety recalls.

Within this formula of innovation-to-automotive-application, some automakers modernize their cars as quickly as possible, but others stall change until their hand is forced. Typically, performance brands – those that cling to a traditional driving experience – hold off on innovations that would alter the persona of their cars. Aston Martin, for example, introduced its first turbocharged motor this year with the sole purpose of keeping its V12 engine in play. Despite shrinking manual transmission sales, Chevrolet continues to offer every variant of its Corvette and Camaro with a standard gearbox. BMW didn’t introduce a front-wheel drive platform until 2014.

Then there’s Lamborghini. The Italian supercar manufacturer may not offer a manual-equipped model, but it’s also one of the last brands to exclusively build naturally aspirated cars (at least until the Urus SUV arrives). Driving a Lamborghini is one of the most visceral experiences left on four wheels. From the body panels to the screaming engine – it’s non-stop drama. But for how much longer? – READ MORE