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The Legendary Strategist Behind Bill Clinton’s Campaigns Doesn’t Think Democrats Can Steal The Senate

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Democratic strategist James Carville doesn’t think the Democratic Party will be able to regain control of the Senate in 2018, according to an interview aired Sunday morning.

“I think right now most Democrats are trying to focus on the 2018 elections and trying to recruit people and keep incumbents, and you know I would say we have a pretty good chance of taking the House back. The Senate is very, very difficult,” Carville told AM 970 New York City host John Catsimatidis Sunday morning.

The former Clinton operative asserted that the key problem Democrats face in 2018 is the fact that there are a lot of senators who face re-election in states that President Donald Trump carried in the 2016 presidential election, indicating that the electorate leans Republican.

“The only places where we have an opportunity for pick up are, you know, Nevada is pretty good. After that Arizona is less good, then you’re down to Texas and Alabama, and for Democrats to win the Senate back, they have to pick up three seats,” Carville concluded.

The Louisiana campaign consultant is legendary for his victories with former President Bill Clinton, as well as several high-profile Senate and governor races throughout the 80s and 90s.

Democrats need to gain at least two additional seats in the Senate in order to gain a voting majority, assuming the two independents in office continue to vote with the Democratic caucus. Three or four would allow the party to command complete control of the process and upend Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s control of the upper chamber of Congress.

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