True Pundit

Politics

Sean Spicer’s Old White House Job Was Being The Easter Bunny

FOLLOW US!
Follow on FacebookFollow on Twitter

Before he was Donald Trump’s White House press secretary, Sean Spicer was the White House Easter Bunny.

Spicer held the gig as America’s most prominent holiday hare for two years during President George W. Bush’s administration. He was, in fact, the guy dressed up in a furry white suit for the annual White House Easter Egg Roll.

“It gets very hot,” Spicer told Politico back in in 2008. “I can’t see too much, and the bunny does not talk.”

 

“My handler for the event was my wife, Rebecca, who has been keeping me in line for years.”

“Kids love the Easter Bunny,” Spicer also said. “There is something real special about seeing all the families on the White House lawn.”

“Most children are so excited to see the bunny that they are on their best behavior. I really get a kick out of the ones that thank the bunny for their basket or a gift they got on Easter.”

“There are so many children trying to say hi and have their photo taken.”

At the time, Spicer was the Bush administration’s assistant U.S. trade representative for media and public affairs.

“All of the stuff kids got in their Easter baskets from Colombia entered the U.S. almost entirely duty-free, but when the Easter Bunny brought stuff made in the U.S. to kids in Colombia, he had to pay stiff tariffs,” Spicer told Politico. “Congress should pass the Colombia trade agreement and end one-way trade.”

Spicer also decided it was necessary to throw in the fact that the United States “exported about $221 million in eggs in their shells” in 2007. “Canada was the largest customer, taking about 22 percent of the total,” the future White House press secretary explained.

(DAILY CALLER)

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

FOLLOW US!
Follow on FacebookFollow on Twitter